University of Nottingham Ningbo China
Graduate School
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Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) scholarships at UNNC and IGSNRR (2019 Entry)

Reference:

19053DTPBJ

 

Length of Scholarship: 

up to 36 months, subject to satisfactory progression

 

Places:

5

 

Closing Date:

16:00, 14 Jun 2019 (China Time)

 

 

*Important Notes:

We welcome top quality applications for September intake. The scholarships are competitive and we advise you to apply as early as possible. It normally takes 5-6 weeks after the closing date for us to process your application.

 

The available PhD scholarships cover:

  • Tuition fee
  • Monthly stipend
  • Medical insurance with designate providers
  • All above items are covered for up to 36 months based on satisfactory progression
  • All regulations set out in the UNNC PGR Scholarship Policy apply

In addition to the above scholarship, successful candidates also have the opportunity to carry out paid teaching or research assistant duties at UNNC.

Available PhD research areas:

The UNNC-IGSNRR scholarships are to support five of the following research projects outlined under the following themes:

1. Investigation of the impacts on water disaster risk related (drought and floods) under the implications of Belt and Road Initiative: The Case of NW China and C Asia

IGSNRR Supervisor: Professor Juanle WANG

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Faith CHAN (School of Geographical Sciences) and Dr David O’BRIEN (School of International Studies)

Please click to read about project details

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is potentially the largest infrastructure development scheme in our lifetime, with an estimated cost of over four trillion US dollars.

The BRI has no geographic boundaries, and currently the economic corridors in the BRI connects 65 countries through both land and marine routes, which enhances various types of large-scale road and sea logistics, developments and trades, cross-boundary high-speed railway and trans-national road networks construction projects, boosting multi-national trade and energy resource investments between China and the BRI countries. The BRI has critical transboundary implications for water resources that need to be considered, but the impacts of water extremes (drought and floods) have been occurred along the BRI countries and caused substantial socio-economic losses and political issues, for example in the NW China and Central Asia. 

In this proposed project, there are three major dimensions:

  1. Using the geographical information system (GIS) and remote sensing techniques to construct the potential impacts to water resources (and biodiversity hotspots, etc.) on the locations along the BRI economic corridors, thus we can understand a better strategy to manage the transboundary ecological conservation and water resources management; 
  2. Using the qualitative methods (e.g. textural analyses) to investigate on the current and previous water resources management (especially focusing on water extremes) in the case of China-Central Asia-West Asia Corridor;
  3. Using big data analysis and evaluation method to find the high-risk regions and influenced factors, provide disaster risk reduction data, information and knowledge products, and propose related solutions for the policy makers in regional or international levels.

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Faith Chan (faith.chan@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Juanle Wang (wangjl@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

2. Climate change impacts on hydrological extremes in China

IGSNRR Supervisor: Prof Qiuhong TANG

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Meili FENG (School of Geographical Sciences)

UNUK supervisor: Dr Simon GOSLING (School of Geography)

Please click to read about project details

This project will produce the most up-to-date assessment of flood risk and drought hazard across China under climate change scenarios for the 21st century. The project will analyse the latest hydrological model simulations from several models participating in the third phase of the Intersectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP3), run with climate change projections from the 6th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6). Changes in floods and droughts will be quantified under different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, and the confidence in projections will be assessed by accounting for the emissions and model uncertainties. 

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Meili Feng (meili.feng@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Tang Qiuhong (tangqh@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

3. Patent distribution and industrial development in China: evolution, spatial coupling and transfer network

IGSNRR Supervisor: Professor Jiaoe WANG

UNNC Supervisor: Professor Cong CAO (Nottingham University Business School)

Please click to read about project details

Patents are one of the most important intellectual properties, and invention patents are especially key to the industrial upgrading and economic development in China today as innovation has driven the Chinese economy. Existing studies mainly focus on the relationship between patenting and economic development at various geographic scales, and there has been limited investigation into the coupling relationship between patenting and industrial development and upgrading. 

This proposed project will focus on two major dimensions: 

  1. Invention patents and their consistency with industrial development in local and surrounding areas; and 
  2. Evolution of interurban invention patent transfer network in China: spatial dependence and industrial coupling. 

We expect that the doctoral candidate will integrate the theories and methodologies of economic geography and innovation studies, and empirically examine the two dimensions mentioned above, and compare the values of patents in industrial upgrading of China and other countries.

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Prof Cong Cao (Cong.Cao@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Jiaoe Wang (wangje@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

4. Effect of Infrastructure Development on Market Integration in the Context of BRI

IGSNRR Supervisor: Professor Jiaoe WANG

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Marina GLUSHENKOVA (Nottingham University Business School)

Please click to read about project details

In 2013, Chinese President Xi Jinping announced the establishment of a new regional cooperation programme, officially named the “Belt and Road Initiative” (BRI). One of the main goals of the BRI is to deepen market integration through enhancing infrastructure and institutional linkages. Geographically, the BRI programme covers six land routes (China-Europe, China-Mongolia-Russia, China-Mediterranean Sea, China-Pakistan, Bangladesh-China-India-Burma, and China-South Asia) and two maritime roads (China-South Pacific and China-Europe). Infrastructure is the most significant component of the BRI, which directly affects connectivity of regions and is expected to be conducive to international trade and investment. Better connections and the lower trade costs may in turn trigger the process of economic convergence across countries.

This project aims to analyse the importance of infrastructure development along the BRI for the economic integration of countries participating in the initiative by exploring the linkage between connectivity of countries and their economic performance. Our goal is to study the development of transport infrastructure systems at various scales, including the inter-state, national and sub-national levels, evaluate the effects of urban accessibility and connectivity along BRI, and examine to what extent the increasing physical and soft connectivity influences the society and economy.

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Marina Glushenkova (marina.glushenkova@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Jiaoe Wang (wangje@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

5. Impacts of High-Speed Railway Network on Economic Development of Chinese regions

IGSNRR Supervisor: Professor Jiaoe WANG

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Marina GLUSHENKOVA (Nottingham University Business School)

Please click to read about project details

China’s high-speed rail (HSR) network is known to be the largest in the world. Started in 2003, the construction of the HSR network has greatly improved the accessibility and connectivity of cities in China. However, its effects on peripheral cities or poverty areas are still unknown. This project aims to explore the impact of HSR construction on regional growth, labour migration and income inequality in peripheral areas of China. Moreover, it will study the role of the HSR network in the domestic market integration process, and the formation of regional economic clusters. We intend to provide some answers to the following questions: What are the effects of the HSR construction on development of peripheral regions in China? Do China’s domestic markets become more integrated over time? How is this process affected by the construction of the HSR network? Do Chinese regions form income and/or price convergence clubs? If yes, what is the role of HSR network in explaining these? 

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Marina Glushenkova (marina.glushenkova@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Jiaoe Wang (wangje@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

6. 4D data visualisation-based water resource management for sustainable development

IGSNRR Supervisor: Professor Yi LUO

UNNC supervisor: Dr Ying WENG (School of Computer Sciences)

Please click to read about project details

Management of water resources is becoming increasingly more challenging due to the demands of a growing population and the complexity of the water management infrastructure. Accordingly, there is an ever increasing need for water providers and public authorities to be able to critically evaluate, assess and monitor the status of water resources to enable more effective decision making. One method of addressing this need is to use data visualisation techniques which consider the spatio-temporal availability of the resource.

This project will focus on the application of advanced spatio-temporal data mining and visualization techniques with predictive analytics based on statistical and logical inference to create 4D representations in response to temporal changes in water process enabling continuous water resource monitoring and optimisation.

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Ying Weng (ying.weng@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Yi Luo (luoyi@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

7. Current and historic air quality mapping in China 

IGSNRR Supervisor: Prof Baozhang CHEN

UNNC supervisor: Dr Nicholas HAMM (School of Geographical Sciences)

Please click to read about project details

Air quality is a hot topic of widespread concern in China.  Maps of air pollutant concentration are important for monitoring the situation, for identifying the relationship with emissions and for supporting studies in epidemiology and public health.   Models for air quality are typically process-based (e.g., atmospheric chemistry models that track emissions transport, atmospheric chemical reactions, chemical decomposition and deposition) or statistical (e.g., land-use regression, based on empirical relationships between human and environmental covariates and monitored values) or some combination of the two.  Epidemiological studies of chronic disease require historic maps for the last 10 to 20 years and some papers have already been published on this topic.   However, both process-based and statistical models are limited by data quality issues including currency, accuracy and missing values.   This PhD will focus on the development and evaluation of air quality maps for China based on models, satellites and in situ measurements.  Key issues to address are: development and quality assurance of an air quality database, including pre-2012 data, uncertainty evaluation of current and historic air quality maps, identification of the appropriate space-time resolution for analysis.

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Nicholas HAMM (Nicholas.Hamm@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Baozhang CHEN (baozhang.chen@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

8. Space-time analysis of remote sensing and in situ environmental data

IGSNRR Supervisor: Prof Yong GE

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Nicholas HAMM (School of Geographical Sciences)

Please click to read about project details

For many applications it is important to have quantitative current and historic maps of the environment (e.g., land cover, urban land use, environmental and air pollution).   The historic extent range from the present day to the past 10-40 years. Such datasets are needed for environmental monitoring and modelling in the context of land-use change, urban expansion and developments surrounding the Belt and Road initiative.  Environmental epidemiology is another application. Data sources include remote sensing, in situ environmental monitoring networks, socio-economic data, social media and volunteered geographic information. 

Core topics to be addressed in this PhD are: (a) identification of appropriate current and/or historic data, (b) integration and modelling of these big geoscience datasets using novel statistical and machine learning methods, (c) data sharing, (d) spatial-temporal scale and (e) spatial data quality and validation.   The exact direction and application will be decided in consultation with the successful candidate.

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Nicholas HAMM (nicholas.hamm@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Yong GE (gey@lreis.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

9. Space-time modelling of poverty in China and surrounding countries 

IGSNRR Supervisor: Prof Yong GE

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Nicholas HAMM (School of Geographical Sciences)

Please click to read about project details

Poverty alleviation has been a major feature of Chinese policy over the past 40 years.  Nevertheless, by the end of 2012, China still had almost 100 million people concentrated in contiguous poverty-stricken regions.   Poverty shows a complex relationship with the wider geographic context – including the physical environment, natural resources and economic systems.  This geographic context further includes aspects of urbanization, infrastructure (e.g., roads and railways), education and food security.  Poverty shows a complex pattern in shape.  Hence spatial statistical analysis can support identification of the patterns of poverty as well as the relationship with the wider geographic context, both of which can vary in space and time.  This has the potential both to support the development of poverty alleviation policies as well as monitoring the effectiveness of those policies.  

This PhD will focus on: 

  1. Dynamic change information extraction by incorporating VGI and street view
  2. Modelling the relationship between poverty and geographic context: spatial regression and machine learning
  3. Fine scale mapping of poverty incidence and uncertainty analysis 

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Nicholas HAMM (nicholas.hamm@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Yong GE (gey@lreis.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

10. Analysis on the interaction between multiple spaces using geographic big data

IGSNRR Supervisor: Prof Tao PEI

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Jun LU (Department of Architecture and the Built Environment)

Please click to read about project details

Traditional geographical analysis is implemented in geographical space. With the development and advancement of modern technologies of the internet, communication and transportation, all things are connected in new, different, and increasingly, complex ways and these connections may form different and new spaces, e.g. (1) The internet may create internet space and each website may have its own location and relationship with others; (2) Everyone may have their location in social space based on their communication with other individuals. 

The key issues of this research include: (1) how to define the basic geographical concepts of space, (2) how to analyse their spatial distribution, (3) evaluate if the basic laws of space are correct and (4) investigate the relationships between different types of space. For example, what is location and distance in social space and does the first law of geography still work? 

The research will focused on those issues regarding urban residents and POIs in geographical, social and transportation spaces. POIs, transportation and mobile phone data will be used in the research.

Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Dr Jun Lu (Jun.Lu@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Tao Pei (Peit@lreis.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

11. Automated GIS-based approaches for mapping glacial landscapes

IGSNRR Supervisor: Professor Cheng-Zhi QIN

UNNC Supervisor: Dr Ping FU (School of Geographical Sciences)

Please click to read about project details

Geomorphic mapping has been widely used for reconstructing the extent and dynamics of paleo ice, including ice sheets and mountain glaciers. Current approaches to geomorphic mapping typically involves the manual digitisation of glacial landform features from digital elevation models and images which largely depends on human visual interpretation and is a time-consuming process. 

The PhD project aims to develop an automated GIS-based approach to delineating the main types of glacial landforms using topographic and remotely-sensed data. The method will be applied to the Himalaya region to aid the reconstruction and analysis of the paleo ice extent and patterns in this region. This region is a key site for paleoglaciology, but lacks detailed and systematic mapping results. The results will be compared with paleoglaciological studies in the other regions of the Tibetan Plateau, allowing for a detailed examination of the variations of glaciation patterns across the plateau.

    Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Ping FU (ping.fu@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Cheng-Zhi QIN (qincz@lreis.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

    12. Application of the Planetary Boundary concept to the Greater Bay Area, China 

    IGSNRR Supervisor: Professor Fenzhen SU

    UNNC Supervisor: Dr Odette PARAMOR (School of Geographical Sciences)

    Please click to read about project details

    The concept of planetary boundaries was developed to, ‘outline a safe operating space for humanity that carries a low likelihood of harming the life support systems on Earth to such an extent that they no longer are able to support economic growth and human development’ (Rockström et al., 2013). The concentration of human populations into cities, or city clusters, is placing those spaces under enormous social, economic and ecological pressure, in addition to affecting their resilience to environmental change or disasters.

    This PhD will focus on the application of the concept of Planetary Boundaries to the Greater Bay Area, China, and will focus on assessing the status of one of the following areas: (1) freshwater use, (2) land use change and its impact on food security, or (3) how the resilience or carrying capacity of the Greater Bay Area has changed since 1978.

    Rockström, J., Steffen, W., Noone, K., Persson, Å., Chapin, F.S., Lambin, E.F., Lenton, T.M., Scheffer, M., Folke, C., Schellnhuber, H.J., Nykvist, B., De Wit, C.A., Hughes, T., Van Der Leeuw, S., Rodhe, H., Sörlin, S., Snyder, P.K., Costanza, R., Svedin, U., Falkenmark, M., Karlberg, L., Corell, R.W., Fabry, V.J., Hansen, J., Walker, B., Liverman, D., Richardson, K., Crutzen, P. and Foley, J.A. (2009) A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263) 472 – 475

    Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Odette PARAMOR (Odette.PARAMOR@nottingham.edu.cn), andProf Fenzhen SU (sufz@lreis.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

    13. Optimise the Sustainability of Suburb Development based on Eco-service and socio-economic performance 

    IGSNRR Supervisor: Prof Hualou LONG

    UNNC Supervisor: Dr Yu-Ting TANG

    Please click to read about project details

    China has been experiencing rapid urban expansion, as a result, creating increasing areas in the middle of urban and rural transition, or so called suburb.  As environmental impacts of urbanisation have been felt in China, sustainable development and management of these suburb areas have been put on the governmental agenda.  The student in this project is expected to propose a planning strategy to optimise the sustainability of development in a Chinese suburb area using spatial-temporal analyses on social-economic factors as well as environmental conditions, including land cover and land use. 

    Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Yu-Ting TANG (Yu-Ting.Tang@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Huanlou LONG (longhl@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

    14. Chemical and optical properties of brown carbon aerosols and their oxidative potential in Yangtze River Delta Region

    IGSNRR Supervisor: Prof Qingjun Guo

    UNNC Supervisor: Dr Jun He

    Please click to read about project details

    Brown carbon (BrC), an organic fraction of carbonaceous aerosol, processes a strong ability to absorb radiation in the UV-Vis region and also influences the environment by shielding pollutants such as persistent organic pollutants from photocatalytic degradation; hence BrC deems to have adverse effects on the global climate, environment and human health. Hence, this project aims to study the BrC aerosol comprehensively in Yangtze River Delta, one of the most developed regions in China, where yet very few researches on this have been reported. The spatiotemporal optical properties, chemical compositions, size distribution, source apportionment and oxidative potential (health impact indicator) of BrC aerosols are expected in this research scope. In addition to those general characterisation, isotopes (including S, C, etc.) might be utilized for in-depth source analysis.

    Informal inquiries may be addressed to Dr Jun He (jun.he@nottingham.edu.cn), and Prof Qingjun Guo (guoqj@igsnrr.ac.cn), but formal applications should follow the instructions in ‘How to apply’ section below.

    PhD programme structure

    Students enrolled on the UNNC-IGSNRR DTP are expected to complete three years of full-time research and to submit their thesis for examination by the end of the third year. PhD supervision is undertaken jointly by academics from the University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC), Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resource Research, CAS (IGSNRR) and the University of Nottingham UK (UNUK). On successful completion of the PhD, the students will be awarded a PhD degree from the University of Nottingham. No reference will be made on the degree certificate as to where the degree has been completed. The University of Nottingham PhD degree is accredited by the Chinese Ministry of Education and the UK Quality Assurance Agency.

    Eligibility

    • Applicants must have a first class honours undergraduate degree or 65% and above for a Masters’ degree from a British university, or the equivalent from other institutions
    • Applicants must meet the required English language proficiency (not required for native English speakers)
      • English language proficiency
         Qualification DTP Scholarship Programmes
         IELTS  6.5(≥6.0 in all elements)
         PTE Academic  62(min 55)
         TOEFL (IBT)  87 (minimum 20 in Speaking and 19 in all other elements)
    • More details can be found on the ‘ entry requirements’ page of the website  

    How to apply

    Please email scanned copies of the following documents to PHDadmissions@nottingham.edu.cn by 16:00 (China time) on 14 Jun 2019. All documents must be in English except the copy of Chinese national ID. If original documents are not in English, a translated English version is required in addition to the original one. An application missing any of the following documents is incomplete and will not be considered.

    Click for document list

    • A completed application form (all fields filled)
    • Copies of degree certificates for undergraduate and postgraduate studies with English translation (Xueli certificates are required too for applicants from Chinese universities). Applicants who obtained degrees from a Chinese university can provide the “online Verification Report of Higher Education Qualification Certificate” in English obtained from China Higher Education Student Information (CHSI中国高等教育学生信息网) as an alternative of the English translation. 
    • Official transcripts with marks for all individual modules/courses from undergraduate and postgraduate studies (with official university stamp)
    • Two references must be emailed to PHDAdmissions@nottingham.edu.cn directly by the referees and it’s the applicant’s responsibility to notify referees in advance. 
    • English Language test score report (IELTS/PTE academic etc.) if applicable (not required for native English speakers).
    • A research proposal (For Ed.D applicants, one academic writing is required instead of research proposal).
    • A copy of passport (international applicants) or ID card (Chinese nationals, both sides of Chinese ID cards required).
    • An electronic copy of passport-sized photo taken within three months of this application.
    • A brief CV (required for Ed.D applicants only).
    • A Personal Statement (required for Faculty of Business applicants only)
    • A copy of your Masters’ dissertation, or a published paper or conference paper, or a sample of your writing work (required for International Studies applicants only).
    • Any supporting documents to demonstrate the research potential, if applicable, e.g. published papers, conference papers, patents, etc.
    All documents must be in English except the copy of Chinese national ID. If original documents are not in English, a translated English version is required in addition to the original one. An application missing any of these document (except for English language score) is incomplete and will not be considered.

    Please quote the scholarship reference number in your application form if you are applying for any UNNC scholarship.

    Please quote the scholarship reference number in your application form if you are applying for this scholarship.