University of Nottingham Ningbo China
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Recent trends in nutrition and health in China: A review of data

Date(s)
11 December 2013 (15:00-16:30)
Description

The School of Contemporary Chinese Studies is pleased to invite you to the seminar presented by Professor Stephen L. Morgan, Dean of Social Sciences at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China and Professor of Chinese Economic History at The University of Nottingham, UK.

About the seminar

Over the past 35 years economic growth has improved the standard of living, nutrition and general welfare of the Chinese. They are richer, taller and increasingly much heavier than they have ever been. Drawing on large-scale surveys of the physical health of Chinese school students, the seminar will summarise some of the recent shifts in the nutritional status of the Chinese. In particular, I will highlight the implications of trends that can be identified from the recently released results of the 2010 anthropometric survey of school children.

The secular increase in physical stature is evidence of improved nutrition of Chinese children, yet the data for body weight show that up to a third of children are relatively-to-severely underweight. In East China we see a rise in the prevalence of overweight and obesity, while in the inland and western provinces Chinese children are frequently light or underweight. Moreover, the data suggests increasing levels of inequality in nutritional status whichever anthropometric measure we use: height, weight or body mass. Nutritional inequalities serve to underscore the human dimension of high levels of income inequality in China.

Speaker biography

Professor Stephen L. Morgan is Dean of Social Sciences at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China and Professor of Chinese Economic History at The University of Nottingham, UK. His research spans Chinese economic and business history as well as contemporary Chinese business, economic and social development. His economic history research uses anthropometric data to examine long-run change in human welfare since the 18th Century, while contemporary studies focus on the nutritional status of Chinese children.

Between 2006 and 2011 he was co-editor of the Australian Economic History Review (AEHR), a SCCI journal, and in 2012 he was editor-in-chief. His publications include articles in Business History, China Journal, China Quarterly, Economics and Human Biology, Explorations in Economic History, and World Development, among others, along with a book on the strategy and governance of Chinese firms. In an earlier life he was a journalist and editor with news media including the Geelong Advertiser, the Canberra Times, the South China Morning Post, the Hong Kong Standard and the Far Eastern Economic Review.