University of Nottingham Ningbo China
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Rural-urban migration and domestic land grabbing in China

Date(s)
22 March 2013 (16:36-17:30)
Description

The Division of International Studies and Institute of Asia Pacific Studies are proud to invite you to the following lecture by Dr Giuseppina Siciliano from SOAS, UK:

Title: Rural-urban migration and domestic land grabbing in China: drivers, impacts and trade-offs
Time: 22 March 2013, 4.00-5.30pm
Venue: SSB228 

Abstract

Domestic land grabbing is defined as the process of land expropriation and displacement put in place by governments within their country borders to supposedly enhance development. While development-induced displacement occurs all over the world, China is responsible for a large fraction of such type of displacement and resettlement projects. Urban sprawl and land commodification for food security and agricultural modernization are the main consequences of domestic land grabbing in the country. Albeit the attention towards the implications of land grabbing and urbanization on social stability of China has recently increased, studies which try to identify the main drivers of domestic land grabbing and urbanization, as well as to look at the impacts, trade-offs and migrant views, are still rare. These aspects need further study in order to provide better insights into the relationship between rural development, urbanization and land expropriation. Drawing on a case study from a rural island in east China, this paper analyses the impacts of displacement and resettlement projects in relation to: (i) land tenure rights and compensation measures; (ii) rural workers livelihood and the hukou registration system; (iii) environmental degradation. Results reveal that landless people and rural areas in general are facing the risk of unemployment, food self-sufficiency problems, the mismanagement of resettlements, and environmental degradation.

Biography

Giuseppina is a post-doctoral researcher at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, UK. She holds a Ph.D. in Analysis and Governance of Sustainable Development from Ca’ Foscari University, Italy and an MSc in Ecological Economics and Environmental Management from Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain. She has worked as researcher in various academic institutions and non-profit organizations, such as Enel foundation, the IUAV University in Venice, the National Research Council of Italy (CNR), in the field of public policy evaluation, environment and development with a focus on China and Mexico. She has been lecturer in Political Economy of the Environment (University of Siena, Department of Political Economy) and in Planning and Evaluation Techniques (IUAV University of Venice, Department of Design and Planning in Complex Environments).